My recent experience at Hart Park, where I kissed the trail and finished my hike with my face covered with mud, has not killed my desire to run the trails. toad-logo-for-mr.-toads-1Parkinsons may have taken my ability to safely run trails, but that doesn’t mean that I can’t hike them. And so I will. I use my trekking poles and that keeps me stable enough to feel confident on the trail.

This morning I am supposed to go to Hart Park with my step-daughter but it may not work out. I am in what is referred to as an ‘off’ period with my Parkinsons which leaves me feeling weak and unstable. Nevertheless, there will be better days.

Now, what you may ask is Mr. Toads. This refers to an annual trail race put on by our local running club, and it is called Mr. Toads Wild Run. And believe me, it is wild. There is a 20K distance and a 5K, but they both start and end the same. The start is 1 mile of a steep uphill climb to the top where the two races split. The 20K continues on with lot’s of miles of rolling hills, including at least one challenging climb. toads_2014_map_5kThe 5K becomes mostly level until it reaches a steep downhill where it joins up with the 20K runners again. This downhill leads to the entrance to Mr. Toads Gully which is truly wild. Downhill, constant curves with berms on both sides and very narrow, making it difficult to pass. After exiting the gully, about a half of a mile, it is a fast downhill to the finish.

I have done the 20K version and the 5K in various years. I think the 20K is definitely not in the cards for me, but this year I plan to do the 5K. It will be my first race I have ever done with trekking poles, but I am confident I can pull it off. I will have plenty of support from my step-daughter who is going to run it. It will be her first trail race.

This race is not until December so I have plenty of time to train. As with everything else, I leave it in God’s hands.Walking Parkinsons